Spotlight on Winter 2024 Honors Course Offerings

As you plan or adjust your schedule, take a look at the interesting courses below (some of them being offered in the Honors College for the first time!). See the Schedule of Classes for more details and the list of honors courses currently planned for the entire year. And don’t forget the HC 409 options for cultural ambassadorship and civic engagement!

 

Corvallis Campus 

 

CS 331H  Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

4 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 38714

Instructor(s): Prasad Tadepalli

Fundamental concepts in artificial intelligence using the unifying theme of an intelligent agent. Topics include agent architectures, search, games, logic and reasoning, and Bayesian networks. 

 

 

HC 407  Technology and the Good Life

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 34539          

Instructor(s): Ken Funk  

We all seek the Good Life, a life wherein our material needs are met and certain higher goods are realized, and, for many of us, technology has become a chief, if not the pre-eminent, means to it. But technology can also be an impediment to the Good Life, and the roots of this ambivalent nature of technology may lie in our own fallibilities, mental and moral. In this Colloquium, we will discuss the Good Life, why technology can be both means and impediment to it, and how to make technology more of the former and less of the latter.

 

 

HC 407  Exploring Art through Creative Writing

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 36815

Instructor(s): Jeff Fearnside

Utilizing original artwork as experienced on site at various locations in local environments and online, class participants will produce their own original pieces of writing (either poetry or prose) that responds to the art in some significant way. Involves reading assignments, formal writing assignments, virtual round-table discussions and field trips, and other online activities and exercises. Required all-day field trip Saturday 2/10/24. 

 

 

HC 407  Bulletproofing Your Research

1 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 38721

Instructor(s): Jason McCarley  

We will review evidence that the replicability of scientific findings is often disappointingly low, and will discuss Open Science practices that students can adopt to improve the trustworthiness and impact of their own thesis research. Emphasis will be on the behavioral and social sciences, but we will also cover readings from other areas.

 

 

HC 407  Circular Design Approaches—discover, design, inspire

1 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 38722

Instructor(s): Shanna Ruyle  

Choose your own Circular design adventure! Discover what circular design is, what the world is doing about it and most importantly, what you can do to design in a way that respects life and humanity on this planet…then do it! Gather the knowledge and skills to contribute your expertise and designs to help shape the world while collaborating and inspiring others along the path to a circular design future.

 

 

HC 407  The Holocaust in the Digital Age

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 34637

Instructor(s): Katherine Hubler  

A “virtual tour” of Anne Frank’s hiding place. Conversations with 3-D avatars of actual Holocaust survivors.  Tweets from now-deceased Jewish passengers of the ill-fated St. Louis cruise-liner,forced to return to Europe
on the eve of WWII after being denied entry into Cuba, the US, and Canada.
As the World War Two era fades deeper into the recesses of the 20th century and the last survivors of Nazi persecution approach their nineties, scholars and educators are turning increasingly to the digital to preserve evidence, raise awareness, and prompt sober reflection about the Holocaust.  While the technologies have become more sophisticated, new forms of media have actually been central to efforts to record survivor testimonies and bring perpetrators to justice since the end of World War Two.  This class explores the historical intersection of the Holocaust and new media.  It will also analyze how social media, visualizations, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence are currently being used by Holocaust researchers and educators during a time when awareness about the Holocaust is fading and antisemitic incidents are on the rise.

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

HC 407   Murder, Mayhem, and Makeup: Lady Detectives on Page and Screen      

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 35031  

Instructor(s): Clare Braun  

From Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple to Kristen Bell’s Veronica Mars, women have solved some of the dastardliest crimes of the detective genre both on the page and on the screen.  We will look at a variety of texts and films featuring lady detectives—some very ladylike indeed, some decidedly not—to examine the cross-sections between gender and genre.  How do these detectives use their performance of gender to solve mysteries?  How do these stories challenge, reinforce, and/or complicate traditional notions of gender and crime?

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

HC 407  American Identity in the World          

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 37189

Instructor(s): Eliza Barstow  

This class invites you to read about and discuss some the key issues that have contributed to ideas about American identity in the world. As we engage with the class readings, we will constantly ask questions such as: How have people used the term “American” at different points in United States history? Who has been included or excluded from this category at different points in U.S. history? How have American ideas of the “good” or “correct” life influenced U.S. relations with people in other parts of the globe? What are some of the ways in which Americans have consciously attempted to offer a vision of “American identity” to people in other parts of the globe? How have economic endeavors (and challenges) served to shape American identity both at home and throughout the globe? How has various forms of art—film, literature, music—etc. served to create a sense of American identity?

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

SUS 331H  Sustainability, Justice, and Engagement

3 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 38802            

Instructor(s): Deanna Lloyd

Many sustainability crises are local, and the people most impacted tend to be groups already experiencing difference, lack of power, and discrimination. Transformational responses led by those most affected will be examined -- responses that address the environmental problem while also building social and economic power for those affected. The tools and tactics used to achieve positive changes will be analyzed. 

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

  • Bacc Core - Difference, Power, and Discrimination (CPDP)

 

Ecampus

 

HC 407  The Holocaust in the Digital Age

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 34637

Instructor(s): Katherine Hubler  

A “virtual tour” of Anne Frank’s hiding place. Conversations with 3-D avatars of actual Holocaust survivors.  Tweets from now-deceased Jewish passengers of the ill-fated St. Louis cruise-liner,forced to return to Europe
on the eve of WWII after being denied entry into Cuba, the US, and Canada.
As the World War Two era fades deeper into the recesses of the 20th century and the last survivors of Nazi persecution approach their nineties, scholars and educators are turning increasingly to the digital to preserve evidence, raise awareness, and prompt sober reflection about the Holocaust.  While the technologies have become more sophisticated, new forms of media have actually been central to efforts to record survivor testimonies and bring perpetrators to justice since the end of World War Two.  This class explores the historical intersection of the Holocaust and new media.  It will also analyze how social media, visualizations, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence are currently being used by Holocaust researchers and educators during a time when awareness about the Holocaust is fading and antisemitic incidents are on the rise.

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

HC 407   Murder, Mayhem, and Makeup: Lady Detectives on Page and Screen      

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 35031  

Instructor(s): Clare Braun  

From Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple to Kristen Bell’s Veronica Mars, women have solved some of the dastardliest crimes of the detective genre both on the page and on the screen.  We will look at a variety of texts and films featuring lady detectives—some very ladylike indeed, some decidedly not—to examine the cross-sections between gender and genre.  How do these detectives use their performance of gender to solve mysteries?  How do these stories challenge, reinforce, and/or complicate traditional notions of gender and crime?

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

HC 407  American Identity in the World          

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 37189

Instructor(s): Eliza Barstow  

This class invites you to read about and discuss some the key issues that have contributed to ideas about American identity in the world. As we engage with the class readings, we will constantly ask questions such as: How have people used the term “American” at different points in United States history? Who has been included or excluded from this category at different points in U.S. history? How have American ideas of the “good” or “correct” life influenced U.S. relations with people in other parts of the globe? What are some of the ways in which Americans have consciously attempted to offer a vision of “American identity” to people in other parts of the globe? How have economic endeavors (and challenges) served to shape American identity both at home and throughout the globe? How has various forms of art—film, literature, music—etc. served to create a sense of American identity?

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

SUS 331H  Sustainability, Justice, and Engagement

3 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 38802            

Instructor(s): Deanna Lloyd

Many sustainability crises are local, and the people most impacted tend to be groups already experiencing difference, lack of power, and discrimination. Transformational responses led by those most affected will be examined -- responses that address the environmental problem while also building social and economic power for those affected. The tools and tactics used to achieve positive changes will be analyzed. 

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

  • Bacc Core - Difference, Power, and Discrimination (CPDP)

OSU-Cascades Campus

 

HC 299  Communicating Science

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 38881

Instructor(s): Neil Browne & Irene Moore

The goal of this class is for students to have confidence in communicating science through writing, even if they are not science majors.  From internet technology to biochemistry to everyday choices of healthcare, the world is firmly invested in science, and individuals should be able to voice their thoughts, questions, feelings, and understanding of science.  In this class, we will give them the tools to do so through writing.

 

HC 407  The Holocaust in the Digital Age

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 34637

Instructor(s): Katherine Hubler  

A “virtual tour” of Anne Frank’s hiding place. Conversations with 3-D avatars of actual Holocaust survivors.  Tweets from now-deceased Jewish passengers of the ill-fated St. Louis cruise-liner,forced to return to Europe
on the eve of WWII after being denied entry into Cuba, the US, and Canada.
As the World War Two era fades deeper into the recesses of the 20th century and the last survivors of Nazi persecution approach their nineties, scholars and educators are turning increasingly to the digital to preserve evidence, raise awareness, and prompt sober reflection about the Holocaust.  While the technologies have become more sophisticated, new forms of media have actually been central to efforts to record survivor testimonies and bring perpetrators to justice since the end of World War Two.  This class explores the historical intersection of the Holocaust and new media.  It will also analyze how social media, visualizations, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence are currently being used by Holocaust researchers and educators during a time when awareness about the Holocaust is fading and antisemitic incidents are on the rise.

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

HC 407   Murder, Mayhem, and Makeup: Lady Detectives on Page and Screen      

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 35031  

Instructor(s): Clare Braun  

From Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple to Kristen Bell’s Veronica Mars, women have solved some of the dastardliest crimes of the detective genre both on the page and on the screen.  We will look at a variety of texts and films featuring lady detectives—some very ladylike indeed, some decidedly not—to examine the cross-sections between gender and genre.  How do these detectives use their performance of gender to solve mysteries?  How do these stories challenge, reinforce, and/or complicate traditional notions of gender and crime?

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins. 

 

 

HC 407  American Identity in the World          

2 HC Credit(s)     CRN: 37189

Instructor(s): Eliza Barstow  

This class invites you to read about and discuss some the key issues that have contributed to ideas about American identity in the world. As we engage with the class readings, we will constantly ask questions such as: How have people used the term “American” at different points in United States history? Who has been included or excluded from this category at different points in U.S. history? How have American ideas of the “good” or “correct” life influenced U.S. relations with people in other parts of the globe? What are some of the ways in which Americans have consciously attempted to offer a vision of “American identity” to people in other parts of the globe? How have economic endeavors (and challenges) served to shape American identity both at home and throughout the globe? How has various forms of art—film, literature, music—etc. served to create a sense of American identity?

This is an Ecampus course. Tuition rates for Ecampus courses are different than on-campus courses and can be found at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/services/tuition. Registration is limited to Ecampus and Cascades honors students during Phase 1 of registration, then will be opened to Corvallis honors students when Phase 2 begins.